Farore Law contributes to Bloomberg article: “How Corporate Britain Hides Thousands of Sex Discrimination Cases”

Farore Law contributes to Bloomberg article: “How Corporate Britain Hides Thousands of Sex Discrimination Cases”

Farore Law has been cited in an article published by Bloomberg regarding the hundreds of workers who each year file sex discrimination grievances “in return for money – and silence.”

Bloomberg analysed legal judgments available via UK Government’s public Employment Tribunal decisions database [1] and found that 2,195 sex discrimination cases were dropped before court rulings in the past 2 and a half years, out of 3,585 suits in total. This equates to around 61%. Bloomberg’s analysis of the judgments is backed by the separate Ministry of Justice data, which show that the number of sex discrimination complaints at the Employment Tribunal increased by 69% in the year to March. In contrast, all types of cases increased by 27%. Last year, only 3% of sex discrimination cases made it to a final ruling, of which two-thirds saw the claimant succeed.

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New workplace harassment helpline launched by Emma Watson

New workplace harassment helpline launched by Emma Watson

Rights of Women have launched a new helpline for women who have experienced sexual harassment at work. Legal advice will be provided on a number of issues, including identifying sexual harassment, how to bring a claim against your employer, Employment Tribunal procedures, and non-disclosure agreements (“NDAs”).

The helpline was inspired by the #MeToo movement, and is funded by TIME’S UP UK’s Justice and Equality Fund. Emma Watson, who launched the helpline, said it was “completely staggering” that the free helpline for women in England and Wales was the only service of its type. “Understanding what your rights are, how you can assert them and the choices you have if you’ve experienced harassment is such a vital part of creating safe workplaces for everyone, and this advice line is such a huge development in ensuring that all women are supported, wherever we work.

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Government publishes its response to NDA consultation

Government publishes its response to NDA consultation

The Government’s response to the consultation on the misuse of confidentiality clauses (also known as “non-disclosure agreements” or “NDAs”) was published yesterday morning. The purpose of the consultation (available here) was to explore how NDAs and their legal framework operate in practice, and to assess what changes are required to ensure that individuals are appropriately protected from their misuse.

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Farore Law's latest submissions to the Women and Equalities Committee

The Parliamentary Women's and Equalities Committee have asked for further submissions on its investigation into sexual harassment claims - specifically, the use of non-disclosure agreements in discrimination cases.

Farore Law has asked the Committee to widen its remit to look at access to justice generally. The firm’s written submissions can be viewed on Parliament’s website here. A PDF version is also available.

NDAs and confidentiality agreements: Parliamentary inquiry launched

MPs have launched an inquiry into workplace harassment, with particular regard to the use of non-disclosure agreements (NDAs) in the context of sexual harassment.

Although this may be welcome, we have to be very clear about what benefits there are to claimants in the use of confidentiality agreements as part of a settlement following harassment and/or termination of employment following their being harassed. We should be slow to outlaw these, as claimants/victims should be given a choice as to what is right for them in order to move on and draw a line under the trauma. No victim should be forcibly prevented (directly or indirectly) from entering into a settlement agreement with the alleged perpetrator (or those liable for the perpetrator's actions). No victim should be criticised for refusing or not feeling able to litigate on the matter or report the matter to the police - to criticise them in this way places blame or responsibility (yet again) on the victim.

See here for the relevant BBC article.