Farore Law contributes to Bloomberg article: “How Corporate Britain Hides Thousands of Sex Discrimination Cases”

Farore Law contributes to Bloomberg article: “How Corporate Britain Hides Thousands of Sex Discrimination Cases”

Farore Law has been cited in an article published by Bloomberg regarding the hundreds of workers who each year file sex discrimination grievances “in return for money – and silence.”

Bloomberg analysed legal judgments available via UK Government’s public Employment Tribunal decisions database [1] and found that 2,195 sex discrimination cases were dropped before court rulings in the past 2 and a half years, out of 3,585 suits in total. This equates to around 61%. Bloomberg’s analysis of the judgments is backed by the separate Ministry of Justice data, which show that the number of sex discrimination complaints at the Employment Tribunal increased by 69% in the year to March. In contrast, all types of cases increased by 27%. Last year, only 3% of sex discrimination cases made it to a final ruling, of which two-thirds saw the claimant succeed.

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Confidentiality of legal advice: why banks and other large companies could be discouraged from carrying out internal investigations

Confidentiality of legal advice: why banks and other large companies could be discouraged from carrying out internal investigations

Banks could be discouraged from carrying out internal investigations because of controversial limitations on whether or not legal advice can be kept confidential. Some senior judges are now calling for changes to the law, reports Financial News.

It is well-established that advice given by lawyers to their clients is protected by legal privilege. This means that a client cannot be forced to disclose the details of such advice to anybody, including other lawyers or the courts themselves. However, the scope of this rule may be narrowing. Large companies (such as banks) can find themselves being effectively penalised for conducting internal investigations into suspected fraud or wrongdoing that later come to court. This could discourage companies from undertaking such investigations in the first place.

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"Banks and law firms in UK demand more female barristers," FT reports

"Banks and law firms in UK demand more female barristers," FT reports

UK-based lawyers and banks are demanding more diversity from the barristers they instruct as they attempt to end panels of “white, middle-aged men” on their high-profile cases, the FT reports.

Institutions including Magic Circle law firms Clifford Chance, Allen & Overy and Freshfields are among those requesting a gender diverse list when appointing legal counsel.

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